Alana Springsteen Leans Into Her Honesty and Vulnerability To Craft Diary-Like EP, ‘History Of Breaking Up (Part One)’

Alana Springsteen; Photo by Anna Clary
Alana Springsteen; Photo by Anna Clary
Alana Springsteen; Photo by Anna Clary

A dusty orange acoustic guitar tucked away in a grandfather’s garage in Virginia Beach once encouraged a young dreamer to pick up music to pass the time. The aspiring songstress who fiddled with the strings of the life-altering instrument, is Nashville’s latest breakout star – Alana Springsteen.

Since that day, Springsteen had a mission to become a country music sensation. At just 7-years-old, the vocalist would spend long weekends practicing chords and strumming patterns with her uncle, sing the National Anthem at local events, and would even take trips to Music City to submerge herself within the hustle and bustle of the competitive industry. 

While growing up with a guitar in hand, Springsteen would turn to music as an outlet to escape reality or to process rollercoaster-like emotions that consume the lives of young adults. Her fresh perspective that pairs well with her vulnerable storytelling has scored her rapid success. Her undeniable presence and powerful vocals have earned her a management deal, a spot on Pandora’s 2021 “Country Artist to Watch” list, 35 million+ on-demand streams, and a chance to create music with leading names in the business. 

Alana Springsteen; The History of Breaking Up
Alana Springsteen; The History of Breaking Up

To showcase her mature writing and relatable play on words, Springsteen joined forces with Nashville’s well-respected tunesmiths such as Walker Hayes, Jerry Flowers, Jared Ray Keim, Tyler Filmore, and Andrew DeRoberts to produce her recently released EP, History Of Breaking Up (Part One)

Just in time for the season change, Springsteen delivers a lesson-packed project that can help guide or even influence a struggling twenty-something-year-old to flip a narrative or to see a positive within a negative situation.  

The seven-track collection serves as an inside look at how love has impacted Springsteen’s viewpoint and built her into the strong woman she is today. Each ballad tells a relatable story that could inspire a music-goer to start a new chapter of their life.  

“I’ve always been so in love with love. I love talking about love, I love talking about breakups, just all the nuances of relationships inside me,” the budding vocalist exclusively told Country Now. “I just learned how strong I was through all of it. I’m a lot more vulnerable and honest than I thought I was originally. Some of these things I say in the songs, I would never even say to a best friend. It truly is like such a form of therapy, music has always been that to me. I think as I was writing, I was just realizing that these things were true to me.” 

As Springsteen left her soul on the writing table to carefully craft her diary-inspired album, she also challenged herself by taking on a co-producer role to bring five of the seven hits alive. “It’s such a dream and something that I’ve always loved. Just how you can convey emotion through sound. For instance, a guitar can make you feel happy, or a certain organ sound can make you feel anxious. I have always just loved the way you can bring a song to life with all these sounds,” she shares about the production process. “I’m just so grateful to all the creatives that helped me along in the process and the collaborators. Just to sit in these rooms and bounce ideas off of each other – it’s one of my favorite parts. I want my fans to feel that every single piece of my art, whether it’s from social media, whether it’s my music, whether it’s the clothes I wear, I want them to feel me in every part of it.”

As if wearing the producer hat wasn’t challenging enough, the “Fancy Like” artist, Walker Hayes, has nudged Springsteen to step outside of her comfort zone even more with the mid-tempo track “Zero Trucks.” 

During their time penning the happy-go-lucky hit together via Zoom, the hitmaker became a mentor to the emerging artist by teaching her how to open her heart to construct a truthful and authentic melody. “I love the way he writes. He’s so uniquely himself,” she shares with Country Now reporter Tiffany Goldstein. “The song idea that he brought in, I instantly fell in love with it because honestly, I have never written a song like this. I have never gravitated toward that side of music, but something about it felt right. ‘Zero Trucks’ balances out my project, and it just ended the EP on a smile. I can’t listen to the song and not be happy.” 

After cco-writing with Hayes and fellow country newcomer Roman Alexander on “Trying Not To,” Springsteen confessed that she would love to team up with other artists making waves for part two of her record. The second volume does not have a release date set in stone, but she clarified that it is currently underway and will still revolve around love and heartbreak. “It’s still coming together as we speak. We are still choosing what songs are going to be in there. I just try to focus on how my voice is different from all the other artists and just leaning into that honesty and vulnerability. So, I plan to continue to push myself and be so real with my fans and be hundred percent myself,” she adds about her new music. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by A L A N A Springsteen (@alanaspringsteen)

While Alana Springsteen fans listen to History Of Breaking Up (Part One) on replay and wait patiently for part two to drop, they can purchase a ticket to see Nashville’s hottest newcomer slay on tour with LANY. Tickets are now available and can be purchased here

Tags from the story